skip to content »

andrew-stasevich.ru

Online dating sites belfast

online dating sites belfast-75

The paper publishes The Sunday Times Rich List, an annual survey of the wealthiest people in Britain and Ireland, equivalent to the Forbes 400 list in the United States, and a series of league tables with reviews of private British companies, in particular The Sunday Times Fast Track 100.

online dating sites belfast-54online dating sites belfast-70online dating sites belfast-90online dating sites belfast-81

In 1963, the Insight investigative team was established under Clive Irving.Thomson offered to invest millions of pounds to buy out obstructive practices and overmanning, but the unions rejected every proposal.As a result, publication of The Sunday Times and other titles in the group was suspended in November 1978. Although journalists at The Times had been on full pay during the suspension, they went on strike demanding more money after production was resumed.On 20 October 1822 it was reborn as The Sunday Times, although it had no relationship with The Times.In January 1823, White sold the paper to Daniel Whittle Harvey, a radical politician.There was a further change of ownership in 1903, and then in 1915 the paper was bought by William Berry and his brother, Gomer Berry, later ennobled as Lord Camrose and Viscount Kemsley respectively.

Under their ownership, The Sunday Times continued its reputation for innovation: on 23 November 1930, it became the first Sunday newspaper to publish a 40-page issue and on 21 January 1940, news replaced advertising on the front page.

The paper began publication on 18 February 1821 as The New Observer, but from 21 April its title was changed to the Independent Observer.

Its founder, Henry White, chose the name in an apparent attempt to take advantage of the success of The Observer, which had been founded in 1791, although there was no connection between the two papers.

It was the first time both The Sunday Times and The Times had been brought under the same ownership.

Harold Evans, editor from 1967 until 1981, established The Sunday Times as a leading campaigning and investigative newspaper.

A compensation settlement for the UK victims was eventually reached with Distillers Company (now part of Diageo), which had distributed the drug in the UK.